Sunday, September 11, 2016

Vernissages | NYC, Chelsea, Upper East Side & Buschwick, September 9

Morgan Avenue L train subway station, Buschwick
Desert dwelling: Andrea Zittel at Andrea Rosen (Chelsea)

Aaron Curry "HEADSPACE" at Michael Werner Gallery (Upper West Side)

Installation views from galleries at 56 Bogart Street, Buschwick

Saturday, September 10, 2016

vernissages | NYC September 8: Gesamtkunstwerk

Chelsea and Hudson river view from the rooftop of the Maxwell Davidson Gallery.
Thursday marked the opening of the Chelsea fall season; a multitude of gallery presented major art exhibitions. The gesamtkunstwerk is present in the immersive installations, where the whole gallery space is involved, sometimes expanding then artwork from the walls to the ceiling and floor. The boundaries between object and space, gallery as container and contained art as objects are blurred. The art viewer becomes a participant in even a multi-sensorial experience, sometimes involving the sense of taste, like in After Pasteur, where samples are offered at a fermented milk-bar.
Ian Davenport at Paul Kasmin Gallery
George Grosz: Politics and Its Influence at David Nolan
NENDO at Friedman Benda
Sarah Cain "Dark Matter" at Galerie Lelong
Victor Vasarely "Analog" at Maxwell-Davidson
Lars Fisk "Mr. Softie" at Marlborough Gallery
The stairway at Paxis International Gallery

The Gesamtkunstwerk is highly present at Lehman Maupin, where the twin brothers Gustavo and Otavio Pandolfo, known as OSGEMEOS. From the gallery statement the artists "transform multiple rooms into an immersive installation that combines drawing, painting, collage, mixed media sculpture, and kinetic and audio elements. These newest works represent an evolution of the style OSGEMEOS has honed over decades, while also returning to their early experimentation with diverse mediums, including new oil paintings. This exhibition will offer a heightened multi-sensory experience that embraces the power of human imagination and the vast possibilities in visually interpreting the subconscious." OSGEMEOS emerged in Brazil in the late 1980s as graffiti writers, influenced by  New York street art.
 
OSGEMEOS "Silence of the Music" at Lehman Maupin
Hamish Fulton "Walking Artist" exhibition is of a different nature, yet based on Gesamtkunstwerk. In Hamish Fulton's work, making art comes from experiential practice, walking—which is translated into objects displayed on the gallery walls. Such approach—ephemera from an experience becoming artwork—is almost opposite to the site specific installation, where a physical place is transformed into an experiential ephemeral environment.


Hamish Fulton "Walking Artist" at Josée Bienvenu Gallery

Sol LeWitt at Paula Cooper Gallery
Slav and Tatars "After Pasteur" at Tanya Bonakdar Gallery
Rashid Johnson at Hauser & Wirth

Wednesday, September 7, 2016

vernissages | NYC September 7

Today was my NYC first vernissages experience since my transitioning in Rome. The highlight was the minimal multimedia site specific installation "Situational Diagram" at the Dominique Lévy Gallery.


"Situational Diagram" at the Dominique Lévy Gallery
"La Calle" at Aperture
"The Other Side of Time" at Ca' d'Oro Gallery in Cheleea

Monday, August 15, 2016

camminando | Roma: Following the Sun and Shadow


The obelisk is located at 41.902245, 12.457274 in the center of the Square. According to the Vatican website (http://www.vatican.va/various/basiliche/san_pietro/it/basilica/esterno.htm) the  red granite obelisk was is 25.31-meter tall on a base of 8.25 meter. It was originally placed on the axis of the Circus of Nero—or Circus of Caligula.
An early interpretation of the relative locations of the circus, and the medieval and current Basilicas of St. Peter. Retrieved from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circus_of_Nero#/media/File:Plan_of_Circus_Neronis_and_St._Peters.gif

The obelisk has a square plan aligned to true north and its shadow acts as a sundial. The surrounding pavement made of sampietrino (beveled basalt stones) and has inserted white marble markers defining a wind rose. The wind rose markers were not added until 1852 during the pontificate of Pius IX.